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Your budget will ultimately determine what
your special day will be like so try be realistic
with your expectations of your day and of each
other. You don't want to start off your journey
together in debt so discuss this between the
two of you first before you bring anyone else
into the discussion.
If you are the only ones contributing to your
wedding day financially then you have the final
say as to what takes place.
If there are other financial contributors to the
big day (e.g. parents) then you need to share
your ideal wedding day vision with them so that
they understand what you want and you can
manage everyone's expectations accordingly as
they will probably want to have a say in things
too.
Once you know who is paying for what and
how much, you can then allocate tasks, roles
and responsibilities accordingly so that there
is clarity for everyone on how the money will
be spent and who is paying for what as well
as each person's involvement relative to their
contribution.
There are many resources and planners online
that you can use as a wedding day checklist to
ensure you've covered everything so that there
are no last minute surprises or unexpected
expenses.
You may want to consider using a wedding
planner to help you or you may want to take on
the responsibility yourself either way know
that it is going to be stressful at times but try
to remember why you are doing this in the first
place and that's because you've chosen to be
with each other forever.
Wedding venues and catering probably take
up a large majority of the budget so be open
to exploring other options as there may be
alternatives that could be more cost effective.
This is where venues and wedding planners
can play a role in providing you alternative
suggestions.
If you are looking to work with a planner, don't
be shy to shop around and do some research on
them online as well as get reviews from other
couples that have used them before. Planners
can be a great asset in that they have a network
of trusted suppliers that they work with which
can benefit you in the long run.
If you can't survive the wedding planning
process, then you probably won't make it
through real life together as a couple because
your relationship is going to be tested.
If you tackle one task each week by the time
your big day comes along you would've ticked
everything off your checklist and there will be
less to stress about on the big day itself.
I spoke to newly-weds Damion and Sarah
who are 4 months into married life and how they
made their special day their dream day.
How did you meet?
Damion:
We met through our social circle, we were
interested in each other but the timing was wrong
for both of us at that time but eventually we got
together and here we are today.
How has the journey been from single life to
coupledom?
Sarah:
There are always going to be challenges
going from single life into sharing a space together,
little things like shoes on the floor, wet towels etc
but at the end of the day it's worth it as it's your
own space and if you are prepared to put effort
into and adapt to each other, sharing the expenses
and growing into that space together it's worth it.
It helps if you start sharing a new space together vs
moving into one or the others space.
What was your experience when it came to
planning a wedding?
Damion:
The overall experience of planning a
wedding is stressful, the longer you drag it out,
the harder it is on your relationship, if you can get
through that then you're definitely meant to be
together and you can overcome anything.
What were some the challenges you faced?
Sarah:
It is stressful, the finances are tough and
a lot of people get involved, but if you can get
Rel
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tionships