background image
I had a personal experience with this last
November when my father passed away. All the
nurses I spoke to and some of the people who work
in the hospice said, `Yes, the soul usually leaves when
nobody is in the room'. So, the dying person waits on
purpose, noticing everything.
This is what was written about the body
of Paramahansa Yogananda, the Indian yogi and guru:
Officially it is verified: "On March 27th, shortly before the
bronze cap was put on his coffin, Yogananda's physical
appearance looked the same as on March 7th, when
he has left his body. On March 27th, his body looked as
fresh and remained as unaffected from death like the
evening he died. There was no reason to claim that his
body has shown any signs of alteration." Harry T. Rowe,
Director at Forest Lawn Memorial Park cemetery in
Los Angeles.
The body, or the bodywork, remained intact,
although the driver had left it. But isn't it logical after
all? We know that veteran cars can last forever when
properly maintained. Yes, it may not be the latest
model and you probably would have to refit it with
seat belts and a GPS system. Yes, it isn't the most
modern and perhaps a not the fastest, but it is still
running! It doesn't have to die simply because of old
age.
Nowadays, there is an increasing number of
spare parts and technical devices for us humans. 3D
printers are available now and can print an
ear or other parts of the body. Medical scientists
have made enormous progress in stem cell research
and even expect to replicate many body parts in the
near future. Reptiles can regenerate lost tails, so why
shouldn't we as human beings be able to regenerate
as well? In YouTube, there's a video showing a
youngster whose finger was regenerating. Are our
beliefs to blame or is our inability to do so due to the
limitations of our brain?
Recently, I attended the brain training
seminar `40 Years of Zen', where I intensely studied
body hackers who investigate the real powers
of our body. In his book `Tools of Titans', author
Tim Ferriss describes the effects of extreme health and
talks about the research into the real capacity of our
body system in terms of performance. The body hackers
in Silicon Valley don't deal with normal or average,
but rather with what's individually outstanding and
extraordinary.
Today, technologies, suits and supportive
garments exist that enable weakened persons to
gather enough strength to lift a crate. Much will be
possible for us in the future, whether it's from medical
science or technology.
We need to constantly remind ourselves
that 99% of all inventors who ever lived on this planet
are alive today! This will have an enormous impact on
our way of life, our life span, and the overall quality of
our lives.
But let's come back to current facts:
Centenarians represent the fastest-growing
population group, and guess how many are of them?
In Germany, where I am from, there are many, many
thousands of them, about 14,000 to be more precise.
Do you know a city with 14,000 inhabitants? Imagine,
if all of them are 100 years or older.
A friend of mine wanted to buy an insurance policy for
his 11-year-old daughter and the insurance company
told him her average life expectancy was 107 years.
The German insurance industry, nowadays, is
calculating an average life span exceeding 100 years!
Facebook and the internet in general, play a key
role in questioning our belief systems concerning
age. All of a sudden, there are videos and posts from
octogenarian body builders and from active people
who are 100 years old. I recently posted an example
on Facebook of an 89-year-old female surgeon who
still works four days a week and who basically asks
herself, `What else, as a surgeon, should I do?!'
Warren Buffett, who is one of my role models in
the investment world, is approaching his ninetieth
birthday, and for him, it's perfectly normal to follow
his daily work, to build his financial empire and to
campaign for socio-political topics.
So, many things just happen in our brain.
As for me, I sincerely hope that my personal
fight against the effects of aging will soon come to an
end. When I turned 50 I noticed that I had accumulated
a lot of baggage. Among other reasons, this had to do
with my family situation. My father had three brothers
and none of them lived to be 50. This is why my dad
felt guilty when he reached and surpassed this 50-
year threshold. This whole family environment, this
drama, felt like a real burden to me. This is why I had a
video produced on the topic `Fitness in Old Age' with
the objective to separate the chronological age from